Tadeusz Konwicki

Tadeusz Konwicki

Director

Tadeusz Konwicki (1926-2015) was a Polish author and filmmaker. After his education was interrupted by Soviet and Nazi occupations during the Second World War, he joined the resistance Home Army. In post-war Warsaw, he embarked on a dual career in literature and film. His early novels established him as a socialist realist icon, but his growing disillusionment with the communist authorities saw him retreat into autobiographical fantasies from the late 1950s. At the same time, he was the head of the Kadr Film Studio, and one of the leading figures in the so-called Polish Film School. His films – which include The Last Day of Summer (1958), All Souls’ Day (1961), Salto (1962), and How Far Away, How Near (1973) – are distinguished by their sparse and bitter qualities. In the 1970s, he became famous for two dissident novels published by the underground press: The Polish Complex (1977) and A Minor Apocalypse (1977), which was later adapted for the screen by Romain Costa-Gavras in 1993.

Films